Category Archives: Content Management & Taxonomy as Knowledge Management

Desire2Learn Competencies and Rubrics: Part I

By Michael FeldsteinMore Posts (1015) Anyone who has been awake in higher education in the last couple of years knows that there is a lot of attention on outcomes and assessment lately (although with distinctly different emphases in the U.S. … Continue reading

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Common Cartridge: e-Learning Made Easy

By More Posts (42) This is a guest blog post by Jim Farmer, Coordinator, Scholarly Systems Group at Georgetown University and editor at the eReSS project, University of Hull. On September 4, 2007, a summer morning in Adelphi, Maryland, the … Continue reading

Posted in Content Management & Taxonomy as Knowledge Management, Higher Education, Instructional Design, Tools, Toys, and Technology (Oh my!) | Tagged , , , , | 5 Comments

The Promise and Perils of Social Software

By Michael FeldsteinMore Posts (1015) My friend Joe Ugoretz has a new article on social software in the Academic Commons. He provides a good overview of a number of social software tools and suggestions about how to use them. But … Continue reading

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Del.icio.us Feast

By Michael FeldsteinMore Posts (1015) I admit it: Much as del.icio.us has intrigued me, I could never quite figure out how to use the darned thing. Lucky for me, Eric Feinblatt turned me on to a screencast on the topic … Continue reading

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Technorati to Provide Folksonomy Tuning

By Michael FeldsteinMore Posts (1015) According to David Weinberger, Technorati is about to add a folksonomy tuning feature that shows related tags, making closely related content more findable. This is the kind of thing we need to make folksonomies be … Continue reading

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