Category Archives: Instructional Design

Massive, Open, and Course Design

Martin Weller has a great blog post up about course design responses to MOOC completion rates. He starts by arguing that, while completion rates are not everything in MOOCs, they are not nothing either. A lot depends on whether you … Continue reading

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A response to USA Today article on Flipped Classroom research

Update 10/25: Bumped comment from Darryl Yong, a member of the research team, into its own post here. Update 10/26: We now have Rachel Levy and Nancy Lape (who was the researcher interviewed by USA Today) both agreeing with Darryl’s comments. That’s three of the … Continue reading

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Differentiated, Personalized & Adaptive Learning: some clarity for EDUCAUSE

Josh Kim wrote three predictions at Inside Higher Ed for the EDUCAUSE 2013 conference, and I particularly agree with the basis of #2: Prediction 2: Adaptive Learning Platforms Will Be the Toast of the Party Everyone will want to talk to … Continue reading

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Effort and Engagement

I’ve been thinking a little more this morning about the language used by the researchers in the SJSU Udacity report. They focus a lot on student “effort.” But it’s also pretty common in education to talk about “engagement.” From a … Continue reading

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What Blackboard, Desire2Learn, and Udacity Should Learn from SJSU

As Phil noted in his analysisof the SJSU report, one of the main messages of the report seems to be that some of what we already know about performance and critical success factors for more traditional online courses also seem … Continue reading

Posted in Higher Education, Instructional Design, Tools, Toys, and Technology (Oh my!) | Tagged , , , , , | 5 Comments